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  • Writer's pictureCarol McKee

Antarctica: You Have Questions Part Two

You want to travel to Antarctica and feel like you need to choose the best company to get the most out of this bucket list trip. But there are SO MANY companies out there that claim they are the best choice and it's very hard to sort through all the noise. Therefore you need to work with a travel professional who specializes in helping people book a trip to this area and make the right choice for them as the traveler. As an Antarctica travel planning expert in this destination I offer these tips about what it's like to take this trip and what to expect when you are there.


In part one of this series we answered some of the basic questions people considering this trip have. In this post we continue the conversation.


Isn't Antarctica just a frozen wasteland? What exactly do you see there?


Antarctica, often perceived as a frozen wasteland, transforms into a bustling hub of wildlife during its travel season from November to March. This period, characterized by relatively milder temperatures and longer daylight hours, attracts an array of marine life thriving in its nutrient-rich waters.


The star attraction of Antarctica is undoubtedly its diverse bird population, including the majestic albatrosses with their impressive wingspans, soaring gracefully over the icy landscape. Penguins, the quintessential symbol of Antarctic wildlife, are found in large colonies, waddling on ice or diving into the frigid waters.



And the waters around Antarctica are also a feeding ground for whales, including the colossal, Blue Whales, Fin Whales, Humpbacks, Orca, and more. These whales migrate thousands of miles to feast on the abundant food supply. Seals, such as the leopard and Weddell seals, are commonly seen lounging on ice floes or playfully swimming in the icy waters.




Add to all this breathtaking scenery, glaciers too many to count and a constantly changing landscape. This is a place where less than .001% of Earth's population will ever visit and you will not be bored or run out of things to see.


What is it in Antarctica that attracts all this wildlife?


In a word: Krill. Never heard of it? Me either until I started traveling to the polar regions!


Krill are tiny little shrimp that are central to this thriving ecosystem. These a small, crustacean forms a crucial part of the Antarctic food chain. Krill feed on microscopic algae under the ice, and in turn, provide a vital food source for birds, penguins, whales, and seals. The abundance of krill during the Antarctic summer is a primary reason for the convergence of such diverse marine life in this region.


It's rather hard to believe that something as small as this is what sustain something as gigantic as a whale. Of course the whales eat a ton or so a day of this stuff so it all adds up. Baleen whales ( which are those without teeth) lunge feed on the krill which tend to mass together in a ball in the water.


Antarctica, far from being a barren wasteland, is a dynamic and lively environment. Especially during its warmer months, an abundance of life and the interplay of various species all connected through the ecosystem's keystone species: little tiny shrimp called krill.




What is it in Antarctica that attracts all this wildlife?


In a word: Krill. Never heard of it? Me either until I started traveling to the polar regions!


Krill are tiny little shrimp that are central to this thriving ecosystem. These a small, crustacean forms a crucial part of the Antarctic food chain. Krill feed on microscopic algae under the ice, and in turn, provide a vital food source for birds, penguins, whales, and seals. The abundance of krill during the Antarctic summer is a primary reason for the convergence of such diverse marine life in this region.


Antarctica, far from being a barren wasteland, is a dynamic and lively environment. Especially during its warmer months, an abundance of life and the interplay of various species all connected through the ecosystem's keystone species: little tiny shrimp called krill.




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